Become a REST Companion™ (Respite Worker) and make a difference in someone’s life!

87 years old woman outdoors with the help of a walker and her mature daughter

REST is an originally designed educational course that provides respite training to adults and teens who want to offer care to those in need, and assistance to their caregivers. As a REST Companion (volunteer or paid), you give the gift of your time to provide a valuable service. You will spend one-on-one time with a child, adult or senior, giving only as much time as you are willing and able to give.

To find a Companion training course near you, contact the REST Program office at 630-397-5655 or visit the events calendar on our website.

The ultimate goal of this Training course is to assist individuals to become effective Companions/respite workers by learning the three key steps of support:

PREPARE • CARE • CONNECT:

• Respite: Definition/Value/Volunteers Role
• Crisis Intervention
• Introducing the caregiver and the care receiver
• Building relationships with the caregiver and the care receiver
• Overcoming obstacles in Communication

CARE:

• Use of good health and safety practices
• Overview of disabilities across the lifespan (customizable to any population)
• Creating a positive environment to handle ordinary and challenging respite situations

CONNECT:

• Understanding types of assist and adapted equipment
• Planning and adapting activities
• How to set up a successful respite relationship
• Confidentiality and coping skills
• References and support for the future

The course can be delivered in one of three formats:
ONE-DAY COURSE—One 8-hour session, includes lunch and breaks
TWO-DAY COURSE—Two 4-hour sessions on two separate days.
REST ESSENTIALS™ COURSE–One four-hour session preparing Companions to provide respite in a supervised setting.
All materials and follow-up resources are provided.

“Understanding what caregivers go through and the role of the caregiver was extremely helpful for me. It gave me empathy for what they go through — the emotional strain and physical strain of caring for someone with a disability day after day.” 

—  Larry Stratton, Community Impact Director, Christ Community Church

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save